The first wing tsun Principle: “If the way is clear, go forward!”

When in combat, our aim in most cases is to neutralise the opponent. Whether you just want to restrain him, or feel your life is in danger so you use a higher level of reasonable force; this can only be done by seeing gaps in your opponents defences. The first principle in wing tsun is an attempt to highlight the the issue of when and where that gap will appear to neutralise your enemy. Many beginner level students question the right time to move in after gaining a fundamental idea of wing tsun application in combat. “Is that a gap in his defence now?” “Will i be safe if i try to hit” and many more. In this article i will briefly talk more of the application and mentality the first principle is trying to provide to it’s beginners.

When in combat, our aim in most cases is to neutralise the opponent. Whether you just want to restrain him, or feel your life is in danger so you use a higher level of reasonable force; this can only be done by seeing gaps in your opponents defences.

The first principle in wing tsun is an attempt to highlight the the issue of when and where that gap will appear to neutralise your enemy. Many beginner level students question the right time to move in after gaining a fundamental idea of wing tsun application in combat. “Is that a gap in his defence now?” “Will i be safe if i try to hit” and many more. In this article i will briefly talk more of the application and mentality the first principle is trying to provide to it’s beginners.

The most important aspect i believe you must take away from the first principle is the urge to move forward. Closing the gap in combat is essential to finding a gap in your opponents defense. If you opponent exposes himself by opening himself up too wide to ready himself for a strike, you should not hesitate, but spring into action. Breaking your opponents balance with technique and striking to finish the fight.

However waiting for a moment for your opponent to over extend in a fight or expose himself is not a luxury you can have in combat. This is why we involve the idea of “sticking” in our wing tsun system. Using the sensitivity of touch, (usually with our palm or wrist on the opponent’s arms) we can feel and react to our opponents attacks and respond faster than only watching or predicting where the enemy will strike. Once we feel the response of our opponent, the gap in which to strike and proceed forward into becomes much clearer and allows counter-attacking easier and more effective.

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