Mindfullness in danger

‘The Big 7 Capabilities’ are the main focus within the Wing Tsun community following the 3 Principles. They allow us to always be able to look at ourselves and see what attribute within ourselves we must improve to bring us closer to reaching our full potential with the knowledge we currently possses. Here i will be giving my own opinion upon what the first Big Capability means to me in my personal experiences. So let’s get started!

‘The Big 7 Capabilities’ are the main focus within the Wing Tsun community following the 3 Principles. They allow us to always be able to look at ourselves and see what attribute within ourselves we must improve to bring us closer to reaching our full potential with the knowledge we currently possses. Here i will be giving my own opinion upon what the first Big Capability means to me in my personal experiences. So let’s get started!

The big Capilities are:

Attention, attentiveness, imagination

Suppleness, dexterity, flexibility

Balance

Physical unity

Perception, interaction of the senses

Timing and sense of distance

Fighting spirit

Though all of the seven are essential in one capacity or another, i believe that the first Capability to the most important. Attention, attentiveness and imagination are all drawn to the internal practice of mindfulness; The quality of being conscious and aware in the present moment while accepting one’s own thoughts and feelings.

As thought is the origin of human behaviour, without training our mind to understand when we may be in danger the by being attentive about our situation and surroundings, we become vulnerable to attacks.

Attention to the contact of limps and strikes between our body and our opponents. If we happen to enter combat.

And the imagination of our forward pressure from our body, the clearness of mind to relax and overcome our body’s rush of cortisol and stiffness in the centre of danger, while bringing our mind back to our training to deal with the threat quickly and effectively.

Though i believe mindfulness delves us deeper into the psyche. The ability to still our mind under pressure and keep it there as if we was sitting at home, drinking a cup of tea with a good book, while we fight off an over aggressive drunk in a bar is the tool we can develop to control our own behaviour when faced with a threat.

My core belief in mindfulness in combat is developing that mindset. To become more relaxed in combat than more tense. To clear the cloud of anger or fear that may distract you from what is really happening in and around you.

This is practiced through meditation, calm your mind in sparring. Riding yourself of doubtful thoughts, and accepting the fact that the reasons you are scared are legitimate. But to not let that fear control you by making you freeze up or lash out when the timing is wrong. Finding that calm place in your mind to access frequently at home when calm or when stressed, after being yelled at your boss at work, or even in a fight. Controlling our thoughts, controls our behaviours.

Come to the realisation that even though everything around you may have changed. People around you who were once calm may be ready to attack you, fancy glasses that were classy a second ago could be used as a weapon to attack you at any second. A negative, tense, frightful reaction behaviour can be calmed to a relaxed but deadly to protect yourself. That is your most powerful and reliable tool in the face of danger.

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